If you’re home tomorrow night (Monday, February 29, 2016), be sure to tune in to the National Geographic Channel at 8 pm EST/PST or 7 pm CST. The channel, in partnership with Fox Searchlight Pictures, will present the exclusive global broadcast television premiere of Academy Award-winner Davis Guggenheim’s feature documentary “He Named Me Malala,” an intimate portrait of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Malala Yousafzai. Malala was shot and severely wounded by the Taliban while returning home on her school bus in Pakistan’s Swat Valley in October 2012.

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He Named Me Malala” will air commercial free on National Geographic Channel and Nat Geo MUNDO in the U.S., with a global rollout planned within a week in 171 countries and 45 languages.

I was lucky enough to receive an advance screener of “He Named Me Malala.” Keith and I were left speechless by the film, which offers an intimate look into Malala’s life before and after the attack. Malala was only 15 at the time of the shooting, when she and her father were singled out for advocating for girls’ education. Malala miraculously survived and is now a leading campaigner for girls’ education globally as co-founder of the Malala Fund, a nonprofit organization that invests in and advocates for girls’ secondary education.

The film explores both the extraordinary aspects of Malala’s life, such as giving speeches at the United Nations and hobnobbing with politicians, to her typical teenage activities of joking around at home with her parents and brothers and blushing over cute boys. I was so inspired by the strength, bravery, and passion of this otherwise normal teenage girl, who proudly woke up each morning and went to school despite constant threats against her life. The film also explores Malala’s close relationship with her father, who instilled the importance of education and advocacy in her from a young age.

I was particularly struck by the video clips of Malala when she was little—probably around the same age as my daughter, Lily. Seeing those videos of a young Malala laughing and playing with her dad reminded me that Lily is no different than the 60 million girls worldwide who cannot go to school. Lily is simply fortunate to grow up in a place where education for women is valued and encouraged. She is fortunate to grow up in a family who will have the means to send her to college when she is older. But so many girls around the world who are just like her—girls who love to play and tease their brothers and hug their daddies—don’t have access to education.

But you can help Malala make education accessible to girls worldwide. The National Geographic Channel and 21st Century Fox, in partnership with the Malala Fund, have launched a social initiative to raise awareness for girls’ right to education. Facebook fans can show their support and stand #withMalala by transforming their profile picture into a yearbook photo that includes animation that dissolves female users’ photos from the page. Facebook users can visit supportmalala.com to get started. For every person who participates, $1 will be donated to the Malala Fund.

A $1 donation will also be made to the Malala Fund for every tweet using the hashtag #withMalala through March 10, for a total donation of up to $50,000.

So if you stand #withMalala, watch the powerful documentary and show your support on Facebook and Twitter! Teachers can also access free education resources, discussion and curriculum guides, and more at education.nationalgeographic.org/malala.

Disclosure: This is a sponsored post on behalf of Review Wire Media for 20th Century Fox. I received information to facilitate my review as well as a promotional item to thank me for my participation.